Insights: Spring, 2010 (v5:n1)
A chancellor for our times
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a message from Dr. Burt

Above, down, inside out—and Down Under

Welcome Dr. Marchiori as Chancellor

To paraphrase B.J. Palmer, Chancellor Marchiori knows this College above, down and inside out. He’s gone from being a student to a faculty member, a research scientist, an administrator and now, the chancellor. Credentials like that make Dr. Marchiori uniquely qualified to be our chancellor. Full coverage of his inauguration begins on page 14.

Alumni Down Under show overwhelming support
Dr. Ed Devereaux, Dr. Keith McDowall, Dr. Burt and Dr. Donald McDowall at Palmer booth
At the CAA conference, Palmer was the only chiropractic college to have a booth. Here I’m with, from left, Ed Devereaux, D.C., Keith McDowall, D.C., Davenport ’65, and, to the right of me, Dr. Donald McDowall.

Last year, the Alumni Office was asked if someone from the College would be able to attend the Palmer Alumni Reunion Dinner in Canberra, Australia. The request came from Donald McDowall, D.C., Davenport ’75, who, along with Davenport Campus alumni John Waterhouse, D.C., ’66, and Joe Ierano, D.C., ’97, were organizing the dinner to coincide with the annual Chiropractors’ Association of Australia conference in October.

Whether it was Dr. McDowall’s enthusiasm or his ability to keep more than 450 Australian alumni connected to each other and to Palmer, I gladly accepted the invitation. Our office then used Canberra’s close proximity to Australia’s two largest cities, Melbourne and Sydney, to schedule as many individual visits with alumni as possible.

The first person I met at the conference was Jerry Power, D.C., Davenport ’74, who I hadn’t seen since college. He introduced me to other fellow classmates and treated us like royalty. Jerry was, like so many other alumni we met over the next two weeks, so proud to be a Palmer graduate and so pleased to be able to meet somebody from Palmer. It made me realize how important it is for us to stay in touch with our international alumni.

I also attended the Palmer Alumni Reunion Dinner, which drew many appreciative alumni. All told, between the conference, the dinner and the road trips—where I was welcomed into the offices and homes of Palmer alumni—I spoke to close to a quarter of all Palmer graduates in Australia.

While we knew that we were going to meet a lot of people Down Under, we weren’t prepared for the quality of relationships that we would build. That’s one of the things I love about my job, that I have the ability to travel for the College and meet and interact with alumni who are passionate about Palmer—no matter where they live. It’s not a job. It’s really a privilege.